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womens history



  • Productivity Moves With Our Bodies

    by Ángela Vergara

    Researching the professional and familial lives of women scientists brought the author face to face with the impact of domestic and family obligations on women's academic work during COVID-19. 



  • Why Can’t Republicans Elect Women?

    The Republican Party has not matched the gains made by Democrats in seating women in Congress since the "Year of the Woman" in 1992. 



  • The Real Story Behind “Because of Sex”

    by Rebecca Onion

    One of the most powerful phrases in the Civil Rights Act is often viewed as a malicious joke that backfired. But its entrance into American law was far more savvy than that, led by Representative Martha Griffiths.



  • 12 Informative Queer Women's History Reads

    A selection of historical works examine the lives of queer women, the relationship of queer and racial identities, and the establishment of heterosexuality as a social norm. 



  • The Black Women Who Paved the Way for This Moment

    by Keisha N. Blain

    The prominence of black women in today's protests is not a sudden development. In taking to the streets in support of their goals, they are building upon a rich tradition of black women’s organizing.



  • 19 Facts About the 19th Amendment on its 100th Anniversary

    The suffrage movement that led to the 19th Amendment was intertwined with many other social reform movements of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but the broad demands of egalitarian reforms activists wanted remain unfulfilled. 



  • The Template for Using White Privilege to Fight Racism

    by Nancy C. Unger

    Whiteness enables allies in this struggle to push in ways that African Americans sometimes cannot without disproportionate risk. That was Belle La Follette’s secret — she used white privilege to fight against it.



  • Continuing to Reshape Women’s History: The Ongoing Story of Nontraditional Women Historians

    by Julie Gallagher and Barbara Winslow

    The editors of a collection of essays by non-traditional women historians celebrate the impact of the Catherine Prelinger Award (of the Coordinating Council for Women in History), which aided the scholarship published in their book and is supporting a new generation of women historians expanding the scope of the field to address race, disability, indigeneity, and mass incarceration (among other issues).