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Historians in the News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • OAH Statement on White House Conference on American History

    "The history we teach must investigate the core conflict between a nation founded on radical notions of liberty, freedom, and equality, and a nation built on slavery, exploitation, and exclusion." 



  • The Joke’s on Us

    Communications scholar Whitney Phillips argues that the irony-drenched culture of the internet allowed serious white supremacy, nazism and misogyny to flourish unchecked. From the Klan to the Nazis, the far right has benefitted from sowing confusion about what was serious and what was a joke. 



  • The Persistence of Segregation in South Carolina

    The Supreme Court's artful directive to desegregate with "all deliberate speed" invited many school districts to do so as slowly as possible. Historian Millicent Brown was the first Black student to integrate a white high school in Charleston, South Carolina and has researched a book about the experiences of similar students. 



  • Trump’s America Remains Stuck in the Shadow of Reagan (Review)

    A reviewer of Rick Perlstein's "Reaganland" stresses that Donald Trump today presides over a corporate oligarchy that Reaganism helped build by drawing new, politically active corporate lobbyists into coalition with social conservatives.



  • How Mass Incarceration Has Shaped History

    Political forces pushing for mass incarceration have been closely connected to those restricting the power of labor and pressing to keep wages low. 



  • Standing up for Professors

    Washington and Lee University offered a strong defense of its faculty when they were vilified in right-wing media and received threats and online abuse. 



  • Amid the Monument Wars, a Rally for ‘More History’

    “Historians have different views on taking down statues,” said Gregory Downs, a professor at the University of California, Davis, and one of the organizers. “But that debate doesn’t really capture what historians do, which is to bring more history.”



  • Bawdy Civil War Letters, In the Style of Ken Burns

    by Katie Hemphill

    Historian Katie Hemphill's recent crash course in video editing for Zoom teaching let her fulfill a longtime goal: set the bawdiest Civil War letters she found in her research to the stirring sounds of documentary music. Content Warning: Cuss Words.



  • Pandemic Imperils Promotions for Women in Academia

    As primary education has gone remote for another term, women professors with children argue that uneven distribution of domestic labor means their scholarly work is at a disadvantage compared to male and childless colleagues. "“I don’t need a clock extension,” Dr. Magdalena Osburn said. “I need an acknowledgment that this year is trash.”